Dr. Yarbrough
(512)447-0808
6700 West Gate Blvd
Suite 101
Austin, TX 78745
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Dental Bridges

Dental Bridge

Dental bridges do exactly what their name suggests – they bridge the gap between two teeth. This gap could be due to a missing tooth. A dental bridge comprises of two crowns. These two crowns are meant for each of the teeth on either side of the gap. The two anchoring teeth in this situation are known as abutment teeth. There is also a false tooth (or teeth) called pontics. These pontics can be made of alloys, gold or porcelain. The dental bridges can be supported by either implants or the natural teeth.

What Are the Benefits of Dental Bridges?

  • Restore Your Smile
  • Revitalize your chewing and speaking ability
  • Maintain your face’s shape
  • Evenly distribute the forces in your bite through the replacement of missing teeth
  • Keep the remaining and opposing teeth in their original position

There are three main types of bridges:

Bridges are of three main types:

  • The most common type of dental bridges is the traditional bridges. Traditional bridges are usually made of ceramics or porcelain that is fused to metal. These bridges involve the creation of a crown meant for the tooth or the implant that can be found on either side of the missing tooth
  • The other type of bridges is cantilever bridges. These are used on only one side of the missing tooth or teeth.
  • The other type of dental bridges is the Maryland bonded bridges which is also known as resin-bonded bridge. These are made from plastic teeth and gums and are supported by a metallic framework.

What Is the Process for Obtaining a Dental Bridge?

The abutment teeth will be prepared during your first visit to the dentist. During this preparation, the teeth will be recontoured whereby a portion of the enamel is removed so as to make room for the placement of the crown. After the preparation is complete, the teeth’s impressions are made. The function of these impressions will be so that the models of the bridge, pontic and crowns can be made. Meanwhile, you will be given a temporary bridge to wear so as to protect your gums and teeth until the permanent bridges are ready.

On your second visit to the dentist, the dentist will remove the temporary bridges and replace them with the permanent ones. Subsequent visits to the dentist will be necessary so as to check the metal framework’s fit and bite. Each individual has a different case when it comes to this. There are situations in which this dental bridge may be cemented temporarily for several weeks to make sure that it fits properly. This is usually the case with many permanent bridges. After this period has elapsed, you will then pay your dentist another visit to have the bridge cemented into place permanently.

Will It Be Difficult to Eat with a Dental Bridge?

The best thing about replacing missing teeth is that it makes eating much easier. In the first few days after you have had the bridge fitted, it is advisable that you eat soft foods which have been cut into tiny little pieces.

Will the Dental Bridge Change How I Speak?

Dental bridges also help in improving your speech. It can be quite difficult to speak comprehensibly if you have some teeth missing, especially the anterior teeth. However, if you wear a dental bridge which has the anterior teeth properly placed will help improve your speech.

How Do I Care for My Bridges?

Keeping the rest of your teeth as healthy as possible is important because the strength of the bridges depends on the strength of the other teeth. The most basic oral hygiene procedure is to brush your teeth at least twice a day and to floss at least once a day. However, since you will be having your dental bridges on, you can ask your dentist to demonstrate to you how best you can maintain your oral hygiene. Having a regular schedule of cleaning your teeth will help in diagnosing any problems your teeth might have at an early stage. Maintaining a balanced diet is also very important in the overall health of your teeth.

Westgate Family Dental - Steven L. Yarbrough, D.D.S., F.A.G.D.
6700 West Gate Blvd. Ste. 101 AustinTX78745 USA 
 • 512-447-0808

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